Lab 02

URBAN-UNUSED SERVICED BUILDINGS

Since 2008, Puerto Rico has suffered an exodus of thousands of Puerto Ricans. For the first time the mainland diaspora is larger the island’s population. This has worsened after Hurricane María. It is estimated that it will continue to increase until mid-2018. One of the most challenging effects of this phe­nomenon is the sheer amount of abandoned serviced structures. The migration resulting from the island’s fiscal crisis has resulted in thousands of fore­closed homes leaving behind half-empty urban centers with scarce residents and commercial activity. School enrollment was declining prior to the storm causing the closure of 167 schools. Just 3 months after Hurricane María, more than 10,000 students enrolled in Florida school districts. Also, vulnerable historical structures suffered at considerable damage during the storm. The goal is to explore the possibility of rehabilitation and adaptation strategies for existing structures, as well as discuss how to preserve the character and integrity of our historical structures while making them more resistant to natural phenomena. Prior to design, there needs to be an assessment of adaptive reuse potential of abandoned structures considering criteria such as location, design, functionality, structural integrity, legal framework and rehabilitation cost. Damage assessment is key to the process. Puerto Rico’s existing building stock presents an opportunity to take advantage of in-place resources and to reimagine their role in the existing environment to act as a catalyst of urban activity. A holistic approach to building reuse in Puerto Rico’s post-disaster scenario should take into consideration:

  • consider community engagement and appropriation strategies
  • provide an assessment of adaptive reuse potential of abandoned structures considering criteria such as location, design, functionality, structural integrity, legal framework and rehabilitation cost
  • provide an assessment of damage to historic structures and address pre-event and post-event mitigation strategies in structures that are structurally vulnerable or located in risk areas
  • interventions in registered historic buildings should follow the Secretary of Interior Standards for preservation or rehabilitation of historic structures
  • interventions in non-historic buildings should respect historical and cultural significance and avoid new additions which create a false sense of history
  • maximize resources and take advantage of the scale, flexibility and urban proximity of existing buildings
  • implement strategies to reduce energy consumption and urban heat island effect
  • implement strategies to address occupant health and wellness
  • consider sustainable strategies such as the use of on-site renewables and urban agriculture

Project Sites & Development: Identify and select for project proposals definite urban portions where strategies can be developed and exemplified in the following typologies in Old San Juan, Santurce, etc

TEAM LEADERS: Mar Loren-Méndez (University of Seville)
TEAM CONSULTANTS: Darwin Marrero (UPR) | Omayra Rivera (U. Politecnica | Jorge Lizardi (UPR) | Dr. Lucio Barbera | Victor Nieto (UPR)
TEAM ONE: Pedro G. Agenjo (U. of Seville) | Roberto Alonso (U. of Seville) | Emilio Martinez (UPR)
TEAM TWO: Manuel Bermudez (UPR) | Carmen Fernández (U. of Seville)

 

Ave. Ponce de Leon

La Goyco

1313 Ponce de Leon

306 Condado